Family Owned & Operated by The Cottages Senior Living

The Cottages Senior Living Opens Luxury Memory Care Residences in Frisco

The founder and CEO of The Cottages Senior Living talks about their newest Alzheimer’s and memory care facility. Frisco, TX, July 28, 2016 – The Cottages at Chapel Creek, an assisted living residence for those living with Alzheimer’s disease and other memory disorders, is now open in Frisco, Texas. These luxury residences are unique in their design and based on creating a home-like environment and individualized level of care for its residents. The Cottages at Chapel Creek is a fully licensed, 90-bed assisted living facility, with Alzheimer’s Care Certification by the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services. “We are the owner, operator and builder of The Cottages so that we can meet the distinct needs of those living with dementia in these residences,” says Trent D. Quinn, founder and CEO of The Cottages Senior Living. “We believe this attention to detail during the entire process and forward is essential to making the residents feel at home while also providing our professional staff with a proper environment in which to provide around-the-clock, individualized care.” The unique floor plan at The Cottages was initially inspired by Mayo Clinic research and allows residents to live in a smaller, home-like environment. Individual townhomes or cottages, each with 12 – 16 residents, have their own family dining room, living areas and sunroom. Well-balanced meals are served family-style in each cottage. “Grouping residents and caregivers in smaller settings means we are able to develop personal and deep relationships with our residents,” says Quinn. The Cottages concept has been honed by Quinn for years to ensure that residents enjoy an environment where they can continue...

Understanding Behaviors of Dementia: Memory Loss and Confusion

Memory loss is the behavior most commonly associated with Alzheimer’s and other memory disorders. It is also often the most difficult for the loved ones of a person living with dementia, as it requires a great deal of patience and understanding. Alzheimer’s causes progressive damage to brain cells that eventually result in memory loss and confusion, among other behavioral changes. Changes in routine can cause symptoms to worsen. In the early stages of dementia, memory loss and confusion are often mild. They are generally manifested in difficulty recalling recent events, decision making or processing what others are saying. As dementia progresses, memory loss becomes more severe. In this stage, you may notice your loved one calling family members by other names or becoming confused about locations of familiar places, such as home. A person living with dementia may also forget how to use common items such as a fork or hairbrush. Dealing with Memory Loss and Confusion Watching a loved one suffer from memory loss can take an emotional toll on caregivers. If you are caring for your loved one with dementia, here are some tips and techniques to help you respond to memory loss and confusion. Don’t take it personally. Being called by the wrong name can be painful, but remember that it is not intentional. Try to be understanding and remain calm when this happens. Offer a simple explanation. If your loved one is confused, long explanations or reasons can be overwhelming. Instead, offer a brief, simple explanation in an effort to minimize frustration. Evoke memories with photos and other reminders. Photographs of important relationships and places...

Creating a Safe Environment for Your Loved One with Dementia

As dementia progresses, safety becomes a concern. Memory disorders such as Alzheimer’s alter a person’s abilities, causing changes in the brain and behavior that can affect safety. Dementia affects cognitive skills and behaviors, which may make a person’s living environment unsafe. Depending on the stage of the disease, dementia can affect one’s judgment, sense of time and place, behaviors, physical ability and senses. For example, people with dementia may forget how to complete simple tasks or how to safely use household appliances. Loss of sense of time and place is also common in those living with dementia. Getting lost in familiar settings, such as one’s own neighborhood, and no longer recognizing areas in the home can become very dangerous. Confusion, fear, paranoia also play a part in whether or not an individual is safe at home. Loss of physical ability — such as balance — or changes in vision, hearing or sensitivity to temperature are all factors in one’s safety. Living at home as long as possible is important for people living with dementia, but they must be in a safe environment. There comes a time, however when living at home may no longer be safe for your loved one. It is important that caregivers maintain an open dialogue with their loved one’s doctors about living arrangements. Here are some home safety tips to help you create a safe environment for your loved one with dementia. Assess the environment. Carefully look through your loved one’s home through the eyes of a person with dementia. Are there objects that could cause injury? Are certain areas of the home unsafe? How...