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Falls Prevention Awareness Day: 6 Tips to Protect Your Loved One from a Fall

Did you know falls are the leading cause of injuries for adults 65 and older? For senior adults, falling can result in hip fractures, broken bones and head injuries. Falls can affect some older adults mentally too, causing them to become too fearful or depressed to stay active. Falls can happen for a number of reasons, some of the most common factors that can lead to a fall include: • Loss of coordination, flexibility and balance. • Vision or hearing loss. • Medications that cause dizziness, dehydration or interactions with other meds. • Environmental factors, such as tripping hazards around the home. • Chronic conditions like diabetes, stroke or arthritis. If you are a caregiver for a loved one, here are six simple steps from the National Council on Aging that you can take to help prevent falls, allowing your loved one to stay healthy as long as possible. Enlist their support in taking simple steps to stay safe. Ask your older loved ones if they’re concerned about falling. Many older adults recognize that falling is a risk, but they believe it won’t happen to them or they won’t get hurt — even if they’ve already fallen in the past. Encourage your loved one to discuss any concerns about falling, dizziness or balance with their health care provider. Assess their current health conditions. Is your loved one having trouble remembering to take their medications — or are they experiencing side effects? Is it getting more difficult for them to do things they could once do easily? Are changes in hearing and vision beginning to affect daily life? Talk about medications....

The Cottages Readies for Walk to End Alzheimer’s

The Founder and CEO of The Cottages talks about the upcoming Walk to End Alzheimer’s and how the community can get active. Frisco, TX, Sept. 07, 2016 – The Cottages at Chapel Creek and other Cottages Senior Living locations across Texas are gearing up for the annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s. The event is the nation’s largest meant to raise awareness and funding to fight Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to taking part in the Oct. 1 walk in The Colony, the staff at Chapel Creek is also playing host to a silent auction to raise money for its team. “The Alzheimer’s Association’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s is an event that is near and dear to our hearts,” says Trent Quinn, founder, founder and CEO of The Cottages Senior Living. “It is an honor and privilege to take part in an event that may someday help bring an end to Alzheimer’s disease and help the millions of Americans who are living with it daily. It is also our privilege to be able to open up participation on The Cottages teams to our community and the families of loved ones who call The Cottages home.” In order to exceed their goal, The Cottages at Chapel Creek has set up a silent auction on September 15 from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at their residences located at 8111 Wade Blvd., in Frisco. Supporters are invited to stop by and bid on items created and donated by residents and staff between those hours. Donations of items for the auction are also being accepted. For more information about donating, call Kerston at 972-668-5200. The...

Understanding Behaviors of Dementia: Anger and Aggression

Behavioral changes are common as dementia progresses, and these changes can be stressful or even frustrating for loved ones. As your loved one’s dementia progresses, it’s important that you anticipate these behavioral changes so you can deal with them more effectively. Aggressive behaviors — verbal or physical — are common, and they can occur suddenly with no apparent reason. Witnessing your loved one’s aggressive behaviors can be difficult to cope with, but understanding he or she isn’t acting this way on purpose, and knowing the correct way to respond can help. Triggers of Anger and Aggression There are many factors that may cause your loved one to act out in anger or aggression, including physical discomfort, environmental changes and poor communication. Understanding the cause of the behavior will help you know how to best respond. Physical discomfort — Is your loved one experiencing physical pain or not feeling well? It can be difficult for someone with dementia to articulate how they are feeling, often causing them to express it through aggression. Lack of sleep or side effects of medications may also cause aggressive behaviors. If you suspect physical discomfort may be the cause of your loved one’s behaviors, especially if the symptoms appear suddenly, seek medical help. Environmental factors — Overstimulation through loud noises, physical clutter or an overactive environment can be upsetting to someone living with dementia. Large crowds or being surrounded by unfamiliar people may cause your loved one to become angry or aggressive. Most people function best at a certain time of day; activities and appointments should be scheduled during the time you know your loved...

Gene Wilder: Saying Goodbye to a Legend

by Margaret Parrish Executive Director, The Cottages At Quail Creek, Amarillo Sunday the world lost the comedic genius of Gene Wilder. I remember as a child loving his kooky character in the original Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (sorry Johnny Depp, you’re just creepy) and the hysterical Young Frankenstein. What I didn’t know was that Gene Wilder had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s three years ago. His family shared: It is with indescribable sadness and blues, but with spiritual gratitude for the life lived that I announce the passing of husband, parent and universal artist Gene Wilder, at his home in Stamford, Connecticut. It is almost unbearable for us to contemplate our life without him. The cause was complications from Alzheimer’s disease with which he co-existed for the last three years. The choice to keep this private was his choice, in talking with us and making a decision as a family. We understand for all the emotional and physical challenges this situation presented we have been among the lucky ones — this illness-pirate, unlike in so many cases, never stole his ability to recognize those that were closest to him, nor took command of his central-gentle-life affirming core personality. It took enough, but not that. The decision to wait until this time to disclose his condition wasn’t vanity, but more so that the countless young children that would smile or call out to him ‘there’s Willy Wonka,’ would not have to be then exposed to an adult referencing illness or trouble and causing delight to travel to worry, disappointment or confusion. He simply couldn’t bear the idea of one less...