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Hospice Care: Understanding Your Options

As a caregiver of someone who is living with dementia, you will experience a variety of different care options at the different stages of your loved one’s disease. In the beginning, you may be able to provide care for your loved one in his or her own home. There may be times where you encounter a need for a temporary care arrangement so you can get some rest or take a vacation. Respite care and day respite care are some options that may be available to you. After time and as the dementia progresses, it may become necessary to move your loved one into a residential care facility where your loved one can receive individualized care. In the final stages of dementia, you may encounter hospice as a final care option for your loved one. While it may be unsettling to consider hospice, it can help to understand what hospice is and how it can help your loved one. Hospice is a type of specialized care for individuals facing a life-limiting illness, their families and their caregivers. Hospice care addresses the patient’s physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs and helps the patient’s family and caregivers provide the care needed. It focuses on comfort and quality of life rather than a cure. The ultimate goal of hospice care is to enable the patient to have an alert, pain free life while living each day as fully as possible. Hospice is a sensitive subject, and understandably so. Despite the growth in awareness in hospice care over the last several years, there continues to be huge misconceptions about hospice. Hospice can improve...

What to Do After Receiving a Diagnosis of Dementia

Frisco, TX, Feb. 13, 2017 – When concerns about forgetfulness or personality changes prompt people to seek medical advice, the hope is to learn the root cause is a reaction to medications that need to be changed, a fleeting condition or just a series of unfortunate coincidences. When the diagnosis comes back as dementia, shock is likely inevitable for the person living with the disease and his or her loved ones. There are steps people can take to help themselves and their loved one navigate the road ahead. The first thing to do is learn more about the form of dementia, the loved one’s staging and possible interventions to slow progression or treat the condition. Dementia can take on several different forms that vary in their symptoms and prognosis. Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia and vascular dementia have symptoms in common, but are different in their causation and may have different treatments available. Understanding that time is a precious and fleeting is the first step to laying the groundwork to be able to help the loved one. These tips may also help: Gather resources – Assistance may not be required immediately after diagnosis, but the progressive nature of the condition means it likely will be down the road. The days and weeks after diagnosis present the perfect time for gathering information about resources for when they are needed. These resources include support groups, daycare facilities, respite care, assisted living and so on. Help the loved one continue to live life to the fullest – Especially in the early stages, it is important to take advantage of every precious moment...