Family Owned & Operated by The Cottages Senior Living

Memory Disorder Diagnosis: 3 Things Families Need to Consider

The founder and CEO of The Cottages offers advice for families with loved ones in the early stages of a memory disorder. Frisco, TX, April 27, 2017 – Finding out a loved one has been diagnosed with a memory disorder in its early stages can leave families feeling lost and more than a little overwhelmed. Many are likely to find themselves bombarded with information from healthcare providers, and facts and figures they search on their own. Obtaining expert guidance is a must, but so too is taking meaningful steps to assist the loved one as much as possible. “Memory disorders are progressive, often incurable conditions, that can leave loved ones and their families unsure of what to do or where to turn,” says Trent Quinn, founder, president and CEO of The Cottages. “In the earliest stages, there are several important steps families can take to help their loved ones and potentially better position themselves for what the future may hold.” Taking these three actions can be helpful for families and their loved ones: Work closely with healthcare providers – At the onset of a memory disorder, such as Alzheimer’s disease, working with healthcare providers to learn more about the condition, its signs, symptoms and how best to help a loved is important. Families may find, for example, that medications are available to potentially slow the progression. While these are not cures, they may help buy loved ones and their families precious time. Address financial and legal issues – It is often strongly recommended that families begin the process of addressing legal and financial matters while a loved one is...

The Role of Occupational Therapy in Dementia Care

People living with dementia experience impaired cognition which may be seen in decreased short-term memory, decreased problem solving skills, decreased perceptual skills and personality changes. While there is no “cure” for dementia, various types of therapy may help an individual with dementia live independently as long as possible. April is Occupational Therapy Month and we want to recognize the ways in which occupational therapists can help those living with dementia. First, occupational therapists can educate family members, caregivers and those in the early stages of dementia about the disease and its functional implications. “Although remediation of cognitive performance is not likely, the person may demonstrate improved function through compensation or adaptation. Occupational therapy practitioners also assist care providers to help them cope with this difficult, and yet often rewarding, role.” (aota.org) Through an evaluation of the environment and certain adaptations, occupational therapists can assist someone living with dementia to live in their own homes as long as possible. For those living in long-term care and adult day health settings, occupational therapists can help individuals retain existing function for as long as possible. According to The American Occupational Therapists Association (AOTA) there are various approaches an occupational therapist might use to aid an individual living with dementia. These include: Health Promotion. Focusing on strengths of clients and promoting wellness of care providers to promote maximal performance in preferred activities. Remediation. Restoration of physical skills (range of motion, strength, and endurance) Maintenance. Identify what is working well in the daily routine of the person living with dementia and provide supports to help the individual maintain skills for as long as possible...