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10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

Watching loved ones get older and experience the changes that come with aging can be tough, especially if your loved one is showing signs of memory loss or dementia. It can be even more difficult for the individual experiencing those changes. Knowing when to get checked can make a big difference in helping yourself or your loved one maintain a high quality of life as mental changes take hold. Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. It goes beyond typical, age-related memory loss such as temporarily forgetting a loved one’s name, getting confused about what day it is, or making an occasional error in managing finances. There are 10 common warning signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s. While the degree of these warning signs often varies from one individual to the next, if you notice that you or a loved one is experiencing any of these symptoms, schedule an appointment with your doctor. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, these are the warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease: Memory loss that disrupts daily life — Forgetting recently learned information, important dates or events, repeatedly asking the same questions and an increasing need to rely on memory aids or family members to remember things is one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s. Challenges in planning or solving problems — Some people with Alzheimer’s may have problems developing and following a plan. They may struggle to deal with numbers or have difficulty following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills. It may take more time and concentration to complete tasks that...

Tips for Talking with Kids About Memory Disorders

The CEO of The Cottages talks about sharing the news with children. Frisco, TX, Aug. 18, 2017 – When a loved one is diagnosed with a memory disorder, family members have a right to know. Telling adult children can be difficult enough, but explaining the situation and what to expect to younger children can be especially hard. While the conversation is one no parent ever wishes to have with a child, there are tips that can help ease the emotions, angst and confusion that may result. “Breaking the news that a beloved grandparent is living with a memory disorder can be traumatic,” says Trent Quinn, founder, president and CEO of The Cottages. “Doing so, however, is important to prepare children of any age for changes in their loved one they are likely to witness as time passes. It can also help ensure children remain active participants in their loved one’s lives, which can be tremendously beneficial for everyone, including the person living with the memory disorder.” While word choice, level of explanation and details shared may vary based on the age of the child, these tips can help parents broach the topic: Share the news as early as possible – Explaining the basics of what is happening to a family member sooner rather than later is strongly advised. Keep in mind that even younger, school-age children are very intuitive. Chances are they have noticed changes in their loved one. A brief, but honest explanation can help them cope more effectively if symptoms are impacting a loved one’s behaviors. Try to avoid emotions – A diagnosis of a memory disorder...