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Things Alzheimer’s Caregivers Should Avoid

The director of The Cottages discusses things that caregivers can do that make the process easier. Frisco, TX, Jan. 23, 2018 – Caring for a loved one who is living with Alzheimer’s disease can be trying at best. Helping them enjoy life to its fullest while dealing with the ups and downs of this personality-changing disorder can take its toll on the most enduring caregivers. “It’s important for family members to realize that the care needs of their senior living with Alzheimer’s disease will only increase with time.” says Trent Quinn, founder, president and CEO of The Cottages. “There are some things that caregivers can do that can make the process easier on their loved ones and themselves.” Here are some tips on what to avoid in the day-to-day routine of living and loving someone with Alzheimer’s: Leave denial at the door – If the signs of Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia are present, denial will not do anyone a bit of good. While it’s painful to acknowledge that a loved one might be in trouble, getting the concerns checked out is critical. After all, some forms of dementia are caused by other issues that can be treated. Caregivers owe it to themselves and their loved one to simply find out for sure. And, if it does turn out to be Alzheimer’s, early treatment can help slow the progression. Don’t take a trip down memory lane – Asking a loved one living with Alzheimer’s disease if they “remember” something is a very common mistake. While it’s tempting to believe the memory can be jogged, it rarely can....

Alzheimer’s vs. Dementia: What’s the Difference?

  The terms Alzheimer’s and dementia are often used synonymously, but they aren’t the same. Knowing the difference between the two can help you better understand your loved one’s diagnosis and how to provide the best care. What is Dementia? Dementia is a broad term used to describe various symptoms that can impact cognitive functions such as memory and reasoning, one’s ability to perform daily activities and communication. Dementia is considered a syndrome, but is not a disease itself, and can occur due to a number of degenerative conditions, including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and, most commonly, Alzheimer’s disease. According to the World Health Organization, about 47.5 million people around the world are living with dementia. Symptoms of dementia are often mild at first, often beginning with episodes of forgetfulness, difficulty keeping track of time and becoming disoriented or lost in familiar settings. As dementia progresses, symptoms worsen and forgetfulness and confusion become more obvious. Other signs of dementia can include repeatedly asking the same questions, poor hygiene and poor decision making. People may have more than one type of dementia, a state known as mixed dementia. In these cases, people with mixed dementia have multiple conditions that contribute to dementia. This diagnosis can only be confirmed in an autopsy. With the progression of dementia, one’s ability to function independently lessens and the individual living with dementia becomes unable to care for him or herself. Behaviors may even turn into depression and aggression. Dementia is a major cause of disability in aging adults and can be both emotionally and financially burdensome for families and caregivers. Although dementia most often occurs in...