Family Owned & Operated by The Cottages Senior Living

Falls Prevention Awareness Day: How to Protect Your Loved One

  Falls are the leading cause of injuries for adults over age 65. For senior adults, falling down can result in hip fractures, broken bones and head injuries. A history of falling may also cause your loved one to become too fearful or depressed to maintain an active lifestyle. Today is Falls Prevention Awareness Day, set aside to raise awareness about how to prevent fall-related injuries among older adults. There are a number of things that can cause a senior adult to fall. Some of the most common causes of falls include: Loss of coordination, flexibility and/or balance Vision or hearing loss Side effects of medications, such as dizziness, dehydration or interactions with other meds Environmental factors, such as tripping hazards around the home Chronic conditions such as diabetes, stroke or arthritis If you are a caregiver for a loved one, the National Council on Aging recommends taking these six simple steps to help prevent falls and keep your loved one safe and healthy as long as possible: Enlist their support in taking simple steps to stay active. Ask your loved ones if they’re concerned about falling. Many older adults recognize that falling is a risk, but they believe it won’t happen to them or they won’t get hurt — even if they’ve already fallen in the past. Encourage your loved one to discuss any concerns about falling, dizziness or balance with their healthcare provider. Assess their current health condition. Is your loved one having trouble remembering to take their medications — or are they experiencing any side effects of those medications? Is it becoming more difficult for your...

10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

Watching loved ones get older and experience the changes that come with aging can be tough, especially if your loved one is showing signs of memory loss or dementia. It can be even more difficult for the individual experiencing those changes. Knowing when to get checked can make a big difference in helping yourself or your loved one maintain a high quality of life as mental changes take hold. Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. It goes beyond typical, age-related memory loss such as temporarily forgetting a loved one’s name, getting confused about what day it is, or making an occasional error in managing finances. There are 10 common warning signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s. While the degree of these warning signs often varies from one individual to the next, if you notice that you or a loved one is experiencing any of these symptoms, schedule an appointment with your doctor. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, these are the warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease: Memory loss that disrupts daily life — Forgetting recently learned information, important dates or events, repeatedly asking the same questions and an increasing need to rely on memory aids or family members to remember things is one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s. Challenges in planning or solving problems — Some people with Alzheimer’s may have problems developing and following a plan. They may struggle to deal with numbers or have difficulty following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills. It may take more time and concentration to complete tasks that...

Tips for Talking with Kids About Memory Disorders

The CEO of The Cottages talks about sharing the news with children. Frisco, TX, Aug. 18, 2017 – When a loved one is diagnosed with a memory disorder, family members have a right to know. Telling adult children can be difficult enough, but explaining the situation and what to expect to younger children can be especially hard. While the conversation is one no parent ever wishes to have with a child, there are tips that can help ease the emotions, angst and confusion that may result. “Breaking the news that a beloved grandparent is living with a memory disorder can be traumatic,” says Trent Quinn, founder, president and CEO of The Cottages. “Doing so, however, is important to prepare children of any age for changes in their loved one they are likely to witness as time passes. It can also help ensure children remain active participants in their loved one’s lives, which can be tremendously beneficial for everyone, including the person living with the memory disorder.” While word choice, level of explanation and details shared may vary based on the age of the child, these tips can help parents broach the topic: Share the news as early as possible – Explaining the basics of what is happening to a family member sooner rather than later is strongly advised. Keep in mind that even younger, school-age children are very intuitive. Chances are they have noticed changes in their loved one. A brief, but honest explanation can help them cope more effectively if symptoms are impacting a loved one’s behaviors. Try to avoid emotions – A diagnosis of a memory disorder...

The Cottages at Chandler Creek Awarded 2017 Best of Senior Living

We are pleased to announce The Cottages at Chandler Creek, our state of the art memory care residences serving the Austin/Round Rock areas has been received the 2017 Best of Senior Living Award by SeniorAdvisor.com. This award places us in the top one percent of senior care providers nationwide. The annual SeniorAdvisor.com Best of 2017 Awards recognize outstanding senior living and home care providers who have received consistently high ratings from residents and their families. Winners of the SeniorAdvisor.com Best of 2017 Awards are located all over the country and represent the top tier of in-home care, assisted living, and other senior living providers in the country. We pride ourselves in providing the very best care and services for our residents and their families. At The Cottages at Chandler Creek, we provide two living options: The North and South Cottage. The South Cottage is a brand new state-of-the-art home. The North Cottage, open since 1997, has been completely renovated! Each Cottage offers the same level of care and services. Our more intimate living in groups of 12 – 16 allows the staff to develop deeper relationships with our residents. And, this smaller setting allows the residents more comfort and familiarity while living with dementia. If you would like to learn more about The Cottages at Chandler Creek, please contact us online or schedule a...

Caregiver Depression: A Very Real, Very Common Concern

Caring for a family member or friend who is living with a memory disorder is a labor of love. The decision to do so is made for many reasons, most often because loved ones feel a deep emotional need to embark on this often rewarding, but challenging pursuit. While it can feel very good to be able to support a loved one in a time of need, providing constant help can take its toll on caregivers. After all, providing care around the clock to someone with a memory disorder calls for long hours, hard work and the willingness to face unpredictability. As time passes, the work can be very emotionally draining. The American Psychological Association estimates about 40 to 70 percent of family caregivers will experience the symptoms of depression. Another 25 to 50 percent may show signs of major depression as the emotional drains of caregiving take serious tolls. The effects are often felt, the APA points out, due to the overtaxing caregivers are likely to face. Most dedicate at least 20 hours a week to providing care to their loved ones. This part-time commitment is generally performed on top of a regular workweek. Essentially, caregiving is likely to leave caregivers with very little time to rest and provide care for themselves. Caregivers may find their sleeping habits disrupted, anxiety levels higher, eating schedules off kilter and more. All of that adds up to a real concern for caregiver health. Caregivers facing depression, healthcare providers say, may not even realize it. As they are pulled in multiple directions, trying to do their best each day, they may overlook...