Family Owned & Operated by The Cottages Senior Living

The Cottages at Chandler Creek Awarded 2017 Best of Senior Living

We are pleased to announce The Cottages at Chandler Creek, our state of the art memory care residences serving the Austin/Round Rock areas has been received the 2017 Best of Senior Living Award by SeniorAdvisor.com. This award places us in the top one percent of senior care providers nationwide. The annual SeniorAdvisor.com Best of 2017 Awards recognize outstanding senior living and home care providers who have received consistently high ratings from residents and their families. Winners of the SeniorAdvisor.com Best of 2017 Awards are located all over the country and represent the top tier of in-home care, assisted living, and other senior living providers in the country. We pride ourselves in providing the very best care and services for our residents and their families. At The Cottages at Chandler Creek, we provide two living options: The North and South Cottage. The South Cottage is a brand new state-of-the-art home. The North Cottage, open since 1997, has been completely renovated! Each Cottage offers the same level of care and services. Our more intimate living in groups of 12 – 16 allows the staff to develop deeper relationships with our residents. And, this smaller setting allows the residents more comfort and familiarity while living with dementia. If you would like to learn more about The Cottages at Chandler Creek, please contact us online or schedule a...

Caregiver Depression: A Very Real, Very Common Concern

Caring for a family member or friend who is living with a memory disorder is a labor of love. The decision to do so is made for many reasons, most often because loved ones feel a deep emotional need to embark on this often rewarding, but challenging pursuit. While it can feel very good to be able to support a loved one in a time of need, providing constant help can take its toll on caregivers. After all, providing care around the clock to someone with a memory disorder calls for long hours, hard work and the willingness to face unpredictability. As time passes, the work can be very emotionally draining. The American Psychological Association estimates about 40 to 70 percent of family caregivers will experience the symptoms of depression. Another 25 to 50 percent may show signs of major depression as the emotional drains of caregiving take serious tolls. The effects are often felt, the APA points out, due to the overtaxing caregivers are likely to face. Most dedicate at least 20 hours a week to providing care to their loved ones. This part-time commitment is generally performed on top of a regular workweek. Essentially, caregiving is likely to leave caregivers with very little time to rest and provide care for themselves. Caregivers may find their sleeping habits disrupted, anxiety levels higher, eating schedules off kilter and more. All of that adds up to a real concern for caregiver health. Caregivers facing depression, healthcare providers say, may not even realize it. As they are pulled in multiple directions, trying to do their best each day, they may overlook...

Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month: FAQs about Alzheimer’s

Worldwide, 47 million people are living with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. No matter how common it may be, Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging. June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. Here are some important things everyone should know about Alzheimer’s and dementia. (Facts and figures below provided by the Alzheimer’s Association.) What is Alzheimer’s? Alzheimer’s is a disease that attacks the brain. It is defined by progressive mental deterioration that can occur in middle or old age due to generalized degeneration of the brain. It is the most common form of dementia. Because it is a progressive disease, symptoms gradually worsen over the years. In its early stages, memory loss is mild, but late-stage Alzheimer’s can affect an individual’s ability to communicate and respond to his or her environment. Who is affected by Alzheimer’s? Alzheimer’s disease affects an estimated 5.5 million Americans of all ages. By 2050, this number could rise as high as 16 million. Every 66 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer’s. Of those living with Alzheimer’s disease, 5.3 million are age 65 and older. About one in 10 people age 65 and older has Alzheimer’s. Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s are women. What are the signs of Alzheimer’s? If your loved one is experiencing a decline in memory, thinking or reasoning skills, it may be a sign your loved one has Alzheimer’s or dementia. Here are some of the common symptoms of Alzheimer’s. (Signs and symptoms may vary from one individual to the next.) • Memory loss that disrupts daily life • Challenges in planning or solving problems •...

The Unique Challenges Faced by Millennial Caregivers

Older teenagers and young adults in their 20s aren’t the people we picture when we think of “caregivers.” Often we think of older adults, caring for much older parents. But it’s becoming more and more common for the younger generation—some not yet out of high school—to step in as caregivers for aging and ailing parents and grandparents. Read...

Help End Alzheimer’s on The Longest Day

On the longest day of the year — the summer solstice on June 21 — you’re invited to team up with the Alzheimer’s Association to help end Alzheimer’s. The Longest Day is an event all about love. Love for those affected by Alzheimer’s. The Alzheimer’s Association invites you to join with family and friends across the country and the world to raise funds and awareness to help end Alzheimer’s disease. More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s today. By 2050, this number could rise as high as 16 million, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Every 66 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Together, with the Alzheimer’s Association, you can help raise awareness for care and support while advancing research toward finding a cure. Why June 21? The duration of the sunrise-to-sunset event on the longest day of the year symbolizes the challenging journey faced by those living with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers. Teams are encouraged to turn their passions and hobbies into unique experiences they can share with others as they participate in The Longest Day to honor those living with the disease. Here’s how you can participate: Select an activity you love. Do something you love — or honor a caregiver, someone living with Alzheimer’s, or someone you’ve lost by selecting his or her favorite hobby. Pick a way to participate. Start or join a team, host an event, or register as an individual. Choose the way that works best for you! Raise money to move the cause forward. To advance...