Family Owned & Operated by The Cottages Senior Living

How Persons with Memory Impairments Can Benefit from Assisted Living Residences

The Executive Director at The Cottages explains the benefits of assisted living for its memory-impaired residents. Frisco, Texas, Nov. 25, 2017 – People living with Alzheimer’s and other mental disorders can receive personalized quality attention at assisted living centers dedicated to memory care. The residences at The Cottages are tailored to meet each individual’s mental, physical and emotional needs. The family setting at these premises ensures everyone receives personalized attention which goes a long way to help residents manage their health disorders. “Memory care is our chief focus and specialty. We know the difficulty that memory loss can have on a family, and we’re here to offer the help you need,” explains the Executive Director, Mary Poole at The Cottages of Chapel Creek in Frisco, Texas. “We have the resources and support groups to help. But, more than that, we become a part of your family in caring for the people you love.” Some benefits of assisted living for their residents: Home away from home – Residents live in small, home-like settings, with separate dining rooms, sunrooms, and living areas. Residents are served well-balanced meals, family-style in every cottage. These small intimate settings make it easy for care-givers to develop deep and personal relationships with their residents. Access to top-notch health care – People with Alzheimer’s disease and other mental disorders can access quality medical care from highly qualified medical staff available around the clock. The facilities have engaged the services of certified medical aides and licensed nurses to meet their residents’ health needs. Personalized care – Persons living with Alzheimer’s and other mental disorders have needs that vary...

What Services Do Assisted Living Residences Offer to Persons with Memory Disorders?

The Vice President of Operations of The Cottages talks about the services they offer. Frisco, Texas, Oct. 25, 2017– Many families in Texas choose to take their loved ones who have memory disorders to assisted living residences. These facilities provide a warm, caring environment to residents, making them feel accepted and cared for. These facilities have family-style dining where an on-site chef prepares tasty, well-balanced meals that are served to the residents. Our residents are always in good company. We have friendly caregivers who understand everyone’s needs,” says the Vice President of Operations. “We are caregivers, housekeepers, nurses, chefs, and administrators, but most importantly, we are that Cottage Family Member to all the residents.” The services provided to residents include: Health and wellness – Residents receive top-notch health services with all-inclusive pricing and no hidden fees. The services include highly-qualified staffing (24-hour), daily laundry and housekeeping, access to daily nursing, wellness monitoring, personalized care for Alzheimer’s at all of its stages, menu evaluation and much more. Respite care – This is for those seeking a temporary arrangement, or for those caregivers in need of rest. Respite care covers any amount of time, and The Cottages are fully furnished to address the needs of residents in need of respite care. Family support –Loved ones that have a family member with memory loss disorders receive help through support groups, grief counselling, and ongoing caregiver support. “At The Cottages, there are unique programs tailored for those with memory disorders,” explains the Vice President of Operations. “We offer many activities for both stimulation and relaxation to our residents.” About The Cottages The Cottages...

Falls Prevention Awareness Day: How to Protect Your Loved One

  Falls are the leading cause of injuries for adults over age 65. For senior adults, falling down can result in hip fractures, broken bones and head injuries. A history of falling may also cause your loved one to become too fearful or depressed to maintain an active lifestyle. Today is Falls Prevention Awareness Day, set aside to raise awareness about how to prevent fall-related injuries among older adults. There are a number of things that can cause a senior adult to fall. Some of the most common causes of falls include: Loss of coordination, flexibility and/or balance Vision or hearing loss Side effects of medications, such as dizziness, dehydration or interactions with other meds Environmental factors, such as tripping hazards around the home Chronic conditions such as diabetes, stroke or arthritis If you are a caregiver for a loved one, the National Council on Aging recommends taking these six simple steps to help prevent falls and keep your loved one safe and healthy as long as possible: Enlist their support in taking simple steps to stay active. Ask your loved ones if they’re concerned about falling. Many older adults recognize that falling is a risk, but they believe it won’t happen to them or they won’t get hurt — even if they’ve already fallen in the past. Encourage your loved one to discuss any concerns about falling, dizziness or balance with their healthcare provider. Assess their current health condition. Is your loved one having trouble remembering to take their medications — or are they experiencing any side effects of those medications? Is it becoming more difficult for your...

10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

Watching loved ones get older and experience the changes that come with aging can be tough, especially if your loved one is showing signs of memory loss or dementia. It can be even more difficult for the individual experiencing those changes. Knowing when to get checked can make a big difference in helping yourself or your loved one maintain a high quality of life as mental changes take hold. Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. It goes beyond typical, age-related memory loss such as temporarily forgetting a loved one’s name, getting confused about what day it is, or making an occasional error in managing finances. There are 10 common warning signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s. While the degree of these warning signs often varies from one individual to the next, if you notice that you or a loved one is experiencing any of these symptoms, schedule an appointment with your doctor. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, these are the warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease: Memory loss that disrupts daily life — Forgetting recently learned information, important dates or events, repeatedly asking the same questions and an increasing need to rely on memory aids or family members to remember things is one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s. Challenges in planning or solving problems — Some people with Alzheimer’s may have problems developing and following a plan. They may struggle to deal with numbers or have difficulty following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills. It may take more time and concentration to complete tasks that...

Tips for Talking with Kids About Memory Disorders

The CEO of The Cottages talks about sharing the news with children. Frisco, TX, Aug. 18, 2017 – When a loved one is diagnosed with a memory disorder, family members have a right to know. Telling adult children can be difficult enough, but explaining the situation and what to expect to younger children can be especially hard. While the conversation is one no parent ever wishes to have with a child, there are tips that can help ease the emotions, angst and confusion that may result. “Breaking the news that a beloved grandparent is living with a memory disorder can be traumatic,” says Trent Quinn, founder, president and CEO of The Cottages. “Doing so, however, is important to prepare children of any age for changes in their loved one they are likely to witness as time passes. It can also help ensure children remain active participants in their loved one’s lives, which can be tremendously beneficial for everyone, including the person living with the memory disorder.” While word choice, level of explanation and details shared may vary based on the age of the child, these tips can help parents broach the topic: Share the news as early as possible – Explaining the basics of what is happening to a family member sooner rather than later is strongly advised. Keep in mind that even younger, school-age children are very intuitive. Chances are they have noticed changes in their loved one. A brief, but honest explanation can help them cope more effectively if symptoms are impacting a loved one’s behaviors. Try to avoid emotions – A diagnosis of a memory disorder...